Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Sushree Shreya Mishra

Sushree Shreya Mishra
Sushree Shreya Mishra
Sushree Shreya Mishra
Sushree Shreya Mishra
Sushree Shreya Mishra
Sushree Shreya Mishra is a hot model from Delhi, India who is trying her luck with South Indian movies.

Monday, September 28, 2009

How to Style Your Hair?

There are a variety of ways that you can style your hair and with so many products and tools making it so easy and even good for your hair, learning how to style your hair is more simple than ever. By using a combination of hair care products and styling tools you can create whatever hair style you desire. Just a little instruction and you can give your own hair the same styles and looks that you see in the fashion magazines and on popular celebrities. These techniques are just a few, but they will get you started in the right direction.

Curling

If your hair is naturally straight or wavy and you want it curly, then you have a couple of options. While your hair is still damp, apply some mousse and dry your hair. Use a curling iron to curl your hair and give it the style that you want. You can get curling irons in various sizes for different sized curls. If your hair is wavy, you can make your hair curlier with a curl enhancement styling product. Apply the product to damp hair and scrunch your hair or separate to small sections and gently twirl. Allow your hair to dry that way, then finger comb into the style that you want.

Straightening

If you choose to straighten your hair, you need to take care to adjust the heat so that your hair does not get burned. You should also apply a hair product that is designed to protect your hair from the heat. Straightening can make your hair silky and shiny if you use good products. You can actually notice a marked improvement in the condition of your hair if you use good products that promote the health of your hair. Separate your hair into small sections. Start near the roots and close the straightened over the section of hair. Draw the straightened down the length of the section of hair to straighten it.

Up Do

You can not learn how to style your hair without learning how to do at least one up do. To create a nice up do, gather your hair into a pony tail. You can gather it at the crown of the head or at the nape of the neck. Twist the hair and roll it, tucking under the ends. Pin with bobby pins. You can pull down some tendrils for a romantic effect.

Carefree, Tousled Look

This is a popular hair style and is great for any length hair. Use a pomade on your hair, then scrunch and tousle your hair, giving it a look that is easy, unkempt and carefree. Use your fingers as a comb and arrange your hair in the style that you want. Use your fingers to scrunch, twist and shape your hair. So with these simple tips, you can see that it is easy create fashionable hair styles.

Once you learn how to style your hair, you can be your own artist and be creative in making your own original, unique styles.

Marco Cello is the owner of NewHairOnline.com.
Visit us if you want to learn more Information on How to style your hair?.


Here in explain about how to choose and make a good hair style and interesting to the see by the crowd because I know you all must have hairstyle lovers around the world and get a haircut more through this blog safely hunt hairstyle ok ...

Kamna Jethmalani

Kamna Jethmalani
Kamna Jethmalani
Kamna Jethmalani
Kamna Jethmalani
Kamna Jethmalani
Kamna Jethmalani born on 10th Dec 1985 in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. She is an Indian actress who mostly performs in South Indian films. Her father is a businessman and her mother, a fashion designer. She started her career with music video of Mumbai Vikings and made her movie debut with Telugu film Premikulu in 2005 while her second film Ranam was superhit.

Kamna was crowned Miss Mumbai title in 2004.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

The Key to Black Natural Hairstyle

Today, a lot of people realized that black natural hairstyle can be stunning and elegant on its own. This is because extra chemical and styling can be damaging to the hair. It may cause excessive hair fall and breakage if the hair is being styled extremely.

The most important thing for a natural hair to shine is the proper hair care. It is a must for you to put extra tender, love and care all the time as black hair can appear to be quite coarse and thick. The key of owning a breathtaking black natural hairstyle is to always maintain a healthy diet. This is because the main component of keeping the hair luscious and shiny depends very much on the protein intake by its owner. Besides, a hydrating shampoo, conditioner and hair masque are essential to take good care of your hair. In addition, hair needed to be shield from the strong wind and sun as the excessive exposure may cause the hair to be oily - making it looks dull and messy.

There are a lot of black natural hairstyles such as medium comb coils, natural hair knots, twisted braids, long curly locks, short braids and others. Most of them require little maintenance and minimal stress to the scalp. These are the most preferable styles by the African American.

Besides that, one of the most charming hairstyles admired by the African as well as the rest of the world is Afro Hairstyle. It is definitely an eye catcher at the first glance because you will look different from others.

Black natural hairstyle also comes in lots of other hairstyles. Most of the hairstyles can be easily done by one at the comfort of their home. All you need to do is to prepare all the necessary equipments to style your hair. Make sure that your hair is clean so that your hair will be easily styled to your desired designs. Due to its texture and volume, there are lots of designs that you can try.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Priyanka Chopra in What's Your Raashee?

Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra
Priyanka Chopra is a hottest Indian Bollywood actress and former Miss World (crowned in 2000) who made her Hindi film debut with The Hero: Love Story of a Spy opposite Sunny Deol.

Priyanka Chopra is playing 12 characters as Anjali, Vishakha, Kajal, Hansa, Mallika, Pooja, Rajni, Nandini, Bhavna, Jhankhana, Sanjna and Chandrika based on zodiac sign in Ashutosh Gowarikar's latest Hindi movie What's Your Raashee? where Harman Baweja is lead actor.

She is currently filming for Jugal Hansraj's directed Yash Raj Films Pyaar Impossible along with Uday Chopra and Dino Morea.

Check out more information and delicious pictures of Priyanka in our previous posts here, here, here and here.

Keanu Reeves Short Celebrity Great Hairstyles

Keanu Charles Reeves (born September 2, 1964) is a Canadian-American actor. He is best known for his portrayal of Neo in the action fim trilogy The Matrix and Ted Logan in Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure and Bill and Ted's Bogus journey.

Keanu Reeves Celebrity Hairstyles
http://www.engagements.ca/images/KeanuReeves.jpg
Celebrity hairstyles keanu reeve
http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~pwtc/software/keanu.jpg

Friday, September 25, 2009

Natural Hair Color

'Dye' your hair naturally, with no chemicals, no lead, no artificial dyes. Commercially available Hair Coloring uses chemicals that remove, replace, or enhance the natural pigments in the hair shaft. There are many adverse effects that can result from their use.

- skin irritation, itching, burning, irritation, redness, discomfort
- allergies to the chemicals like PPD (p-Phenylenediamine)
- hair breakage or weakening, over-processing
- skin discoloration or drying
- unpredictable coloring (mostly with at home dyes)

As well as the undesirable effects listed above, there are more serious health concerns that are potential problems from chemical hair colorants. While there is some debate as to the reality of the problems from hair coloring, the risk simply does not need to be taken.

There are publications regarding the dangers of hair dyes including:

- An FDA study that found lead acetate in many dyes to be toxic.
- Articles that refer to the development of some forms of cancer including leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, bladder cancer, blood cancer, and multiple myeloma as a result of hair dye usage.
- Prolonged use of permanent dark hair dyes can potentially double a person's risk of getting various types of blood cancer.
- Some experts suspect that hair bleach can kill brain cells.
- A known human carcinogen, 4-ABP, was found in some home hair dyes.

Natural hair colorants such as the plant powders Henna, Indigo, Cassia, and Amla (click on each to read more about it) can safely be used to enhance or change your hair color. They are plant powders that are mixed with lemon juice, water, and/or yogurt, in your own home, to make a paste that is applied to your hair and scalp.

Because they are natural, and do not strip the natural pigment from your hair, the color you get from these powders will depend on the color of the hair you are coloring. For instance, henna alone used on white hair will produce red, while straight henna on brown hair will result in auburn hair.

These powders are safe to use on chemically treated or dyed hair, also. They are safe to use as often as you wish. If you color your hair with these powders and get a color that is not dark enough, you can easily deepen it with another application.

It does take a few days to realize the final color of your treatment, since the color will continue to settle into the hair shaft for a couple of days, due to the oxidation process. This natural process occurs as the plant colorants are exposed to the air similar, to how a cut apple turns brown with time.

You're likely to find that most hairdressers are "anti-henna" since they have only been exposed to "compound" hennas mixed with dyes, lead acetate or other metal fixants in them. Our powders are pure leaf powders with no fixants or anything else in it. You can be assured it is the best quality and will not give poor results.

As with any product, test for allergic reactions. You should also try the paste on a small sample of hair (take hair out of your hairbrush for this) to see what the resultant color will be on your hair.

HOW TO USE THESE NATURAL COLORANTS

If you are using Amla, or Indigo you do not need to premix the powder with lemon juice. ONLY HENNA or CASSIA NEED TO BE MIXED WITH LEMON JUICE AND SIT OVERNIGHT. Indigo and Amla can be mixed and combined with the henna when you are ready to apply it.

Whatever combination of powders you use, follow these guidelines in mixing:

100g combined powders for short hair

200g for collar length straight hair

300g for shoulder length straight hair

500g for waist length straight hair

Please note that these are starting guidelines and your hair may need more or less.

Mix henna or cassia with enough lemon juice to make a paste with the consistency of mashed potatoes. If your skin is sensitive to lemon and is itchy after using henna, use orange juice, grapefruit juice, or a liquid that is less acidic than lemon juice.

Cover the container of paste with plastic wrap and let it rest overnight at room temperature or in a warm area. As the henna or cassia rests, the acid in the lemon juice will release the color from the plant powder. This slow, acidic release will get you the best results. If you're in a hurry, put it in a warm place, but NOT a hot place! Your henna will be ready in two hours at 95F.

Once the paste is done sitting, stir in a little more lemon juice or a fragrant tea to make the paste about as thick as yogurt. Add a little at a time to get the right consistency.

For Indigo or Amla, simply mix with enough water to make a paste the consistency of yogurt. This does not need lemon juice. Simply use warm water, adding a bit at a time so it doesn't become too thin. Once your Indigo or Amla is mixed, you can stir all your pastes together that you plan on mixing. Make sure you stir it completely so you don't get streaked hair.

You can also apply one paste first, let it sit, rinse it out, then apply another paste to your hair at a later time. If you apply the pastes at separate times, you will get deeper or darker color.

For instance, to get a very deep black hair color, you should first color your hair with henna, then color it with indigo after the henna'd hair has dried. If you don't want as deep of a black, you can simply mix the henna and indigo together and apply as a single paste.

This process can get messy, so wear gloves to avoid tattoing yourself with the paste. You can prepare smaller amounts to cover roots between full colorings. There is medical test evidence that henna is relaxing, and can soothe headaches. The paste can feel heavy on your head if you have a lot of hair.

To apply the paste to your hair, wash and dry your hair, then comb it through. You may want to section your hair for easier application. Start at the back and work the paste all the way to the scalp. Apply the paste thickly like frosting. More henna makes a richer stain and better coverage. Bring down the next section and cover that part.

Continue until all of your hair is covered, then pile all of your hair onto the top of your head and wrap with plastic wrap. Cover with an old towel if you wish, but the towel may get dyed if the paste gets onto it. Clean off any exposed skin to avoid dyeing it.

Allow the paste to sit on your hair for 2-4 hours before checking the color. If your hair is very resistant to dye, you can keep it on longer. Find a comfortable spot and rest if you wish. If you plan on moving around, make sure you wrap the hair securely, or it will start to drip or seep out of the plastic.

Finally, wash the henna mix out of your hair. Simply rinse with warm water. You can either jump in the shower or hang your head over the tub and rinse most of it out. Finish removing the paste by shampooing the last of it out. Dry and style as usual.

Your hair will probably have a distinct odor to it for a couple of days. If you dislike the smell of the paste/powder, simmer a teaspoon of lavender bud or rosemary powder in water, strain out the plant residue, and rinse your hair with lavender or rosemary tea to combat the herb-y smell. Or, you could add cinnamon to the paste before applying it.

At first, hair dyed with henna may seem coppery bright. Don't panic. This will darken during the next several days if you used an acidic mix. Body art quality henna dyes hands and feet easily, but not your ears or the nape of your neck. If you wiped off the henna, you won't see anything at all. If you didn't clean it up, the stain will fade in three days or so.

Your hair will take 3 days to settle into the true color. This is the oxidation process like when an apple browns when exposed to air. Be patient and do not panic. The coloring might be best done on a Friday night when you don't have plans for the weekend so you can let it settle before going back to work on Monday. Thicker, longer applications mean richer color. Apply henna like cake frosting. Get it down to the scalp.

This works on beards and mustaches, too.

Henna powder is ground from dried leaves of the "lawsonia inermis" plant. When mixed with a mildly acidic liquid, henna will stain skin, hair, and fingernails reddish-orange. It strengthens hair, adds shine, and is anti-fungal, helping eliminate problems like dandruff, lice and ring-worm. It strengthens the hair shaft as it colors, leaving your hair shiny, healthy, and beautif

Henna has long been used as a natural temporary tattoo. Skin is painted with henna, and left to sit for a length of time. Then, the skin carries the color in the form of a tattoo, but fades with the sloughing of skin. It is often used overseas in wedding rituals, and much more.

Indigo is among the oldest dyes to be used for textile dyeing and printing. It is also a powder ground from a variety of plants, including many of the Indigofera species. It is used as a food coloring, known as FD&C Blue No. 2 in the US. The sodium salt of indigo is used as a dye in renal function testing and as a reagent in the testing of milk. When used with henna or amla it can produce a wide range of colors, resulting in the dark hues in brunette colors. It is a basic, or alkaline, paste, unlike henna, so it does not need lemon juice to activate it. It creates strength and shine along the hair shaft.

Amla comes the fruit of a deciduous tree, which is called as Emblica Officinalis. All parts of the plant are used for various ayurvedic herbal preparations, including the fruit, seed, leaves, root, bark and flowers. It is commonly used in inks, shampoos, hair oils, and for fixing dyes in fabrics. It is also taken internally for a variety of reasons.

Used with henna and indigo, it creates a softer brown. It is probably nature's best hair conditioner. Use the paste weekly to protect, strengthen, and create shine on your hair. It can also be made into an oil and applied to the hair daily. It has a smell like raw cranberries and tree bark. Amla enhances waves and curls, but can also be used on skin as a mask to tighten and firm skin.

TO USE: after the henna sits overnight, mix in the amla (1/3 to 1/2 the amount of henna that you used to start) into it, then add water to make the mixture yogurt consistency. Complete the process as listed above.

Cassia is an excellent conditioner for any hair, regardless of color. Cassia is a green leaf powder that smells strongly like mown grass when mixed with water. It is alkaline like Indigo, and does not require lemon juice to activate the color molecule.

It makes hair glossy and thick, shiny, silky and strong - even damaged or bleached hair. Cassia has a golden yellow dye molecule. It will not alter the color of dark or red hair, but will make gray or blond hair turn golden. You can mix it with any other powder combination, or alone, with equally fantastic effects. The conditioning effects last for about a month. Mix cassia and henna to make shades of blond, strawberry blond and coppery red.

These plant powders work great and give you beautiful hair without worrying about chemicals and the after effects. Try it yourself, and you will be glad you did.



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Wednesday, September 23, 2009

How to Stop Hair Pulling

The behavior known as trichotillomania is about releasing anxiety through hair pulling and there are many how to articles on how to stop pulling your hair out. It's important if you've seen this behavior in small children or adolescents that you understand the behavioral disease before you try to stop it.

Hair pulling is another way of reducing anxiety, and is known has an anxiety disorder. What may begin as simple pulling of the hairs on the face including the scalp, eyelashes, and eyebrows, can turn into pulling the hair to the point of baldness.

As with any other behavioral disorder you need to get to the root of the problem. You cannot just ask them to stop pulling their eyebrows out, pulling their hair out or pulling their eyelashes out. This is a response to physical or anxiety issue, not that they actually want to pull their hair out. It's why you cannot just begin by moving a child's hand away from their face or scalp. You need to find out the reason for the anxiety before you can stop it completely.

In order to get to the bottom of hair pulling the first stop should be your physician. If it is concerning a child, make sure it's a reputable pediatrician. They have found that there are some abnormal brain metabolisms that can lead to hair pulling and it's important that you rule these out for you begin treating for anxiety issues.

Once you've ruled out any physical issues concerning hair pulling, then it's time to look at behavioral therapy. Again, learning as much as you possibly can about the psychological approach to trichotillomania can actually help with the treatment. Knowledge is power and with behavioral therapy it really means it.

The thing to realize with hair pulling is its not a normal function, it is a result of either a physical disturbance, or a mental one.

Monday, September 21, 2009

Permanent Hair Straightening Options

Choosing the most effective permanent straightening hair treatments can take a lot of research. When you're spending the kind of money that most of the professional salon straightening techniques charge, you want to make sure you're going to be thrilled with the results. Below, I'm going to summarize my experiences with different procedures and some pointers for getting the best results possible for your hair type.

The first important fact I want to stress is that there are not genuinely "permanent" hair treatments that will last forever without upkeep. The reason for this is simple. Our hair grows out and renews itself on a daily basis, and once it grows, any chemical or dye treatments that are on our existing "already grown" hair, are now nullified because of the new growth.

Any permanent straightening treatment is technically permanent, it's just permanent on the hair that is currently on your head when you get the treatment done. What some people don't realize is that any hair straightening treatment will need to be re-administered as the hair grows out, which for most people with moderate to fast hair growth, can be anywhere from every 6 to every 8 months.

If you have hair that grows exceptionally slow, this period can be lengthened of course, but you should usually count on going back at least every 8 months if you want to maintain the exact results of your initial appointment or self-application if you are trying an at home version (which by the way, I usually don't recommend unless you are professionally trained).

Now, let's get down to the options you have for permanent straightening. I'm going to go over the three that I have had personal experiences with, since I can give it to you from the horse's mouth, so to speak, and give you an idea of my personal satisfaction with each type.

The first one I'm going to discuss is generally the most expensive option, but of course you usually get what you pay for, and this is certainly no exception. The first one goes by two names, thermal reconditioning, which is it's technical name, and Japanese straightening, which is it's given name since the procedure has it's origins in Japan where it became insanely popular with Japanese women due to the naturally coarse nature of their hair.

Thermal reconditioning had been around for years already in Japan before it hit big here in the US, with women first hearing about it widely in the beginning of the new millennium. The first big star to reportedly be rumored to have had the straightening treatment done to her signature long, straight locks, was Jennifer Aniston, and from there the Japanese straightening craze began.

I had this treatment first back in 2004, when I wrote about my experience. I have nothing but great things to say about this procedure. It leaves the hair exponentially shinier and healthier looking than when you go in, and it lasts for as long as your hair takes to grow out. Japanese straightening usually runs anywhere from $500 to $1,000 per treatment, depending on the texture and length of the person's hair who is getting it done. If you have very long hair, or very curly hair, these types will take longer to process and you will be charged accordingly.

I ended up walking out of a specializing salon in Columbus Ohio, spending around $550 with the tip included, and that was with long hair. The reason I got it so reasonable was because the particular salon, called City Cuts, was so experienced they had it down to a science, and they charged less than most other salons where the treatment was more of a novelty than an almost every day occurrence.

I'd recommend them to anyone since the staff is highly trained, and they are headed up by a gentleman who was trained in Japan to do the procedure, so their results are pretty much flawless. I have a coarser hair type, and I was amazed at how this technique smoothed my hair and made it look as if it were naturally straight and full of shine.

You do need to make sure you do not get any moisture whatsoever on your hair for at least 2-3 full days before you wash it, and this is key to getting the best and most long lasting results possible. I'd recommend this treatment to anyone to straighten their hair, I just suggest you do your homework on where to get it done and make sure you are attending an experienced and reputable salon.

Another technique I have personal experience with is one that is less known called cold smoothing. Let me explain why I think this one may not have caught on as much as thermal reconditioning did. It simply does not leave your hair as healthy as the Japanese procedure does. In fact, my hair felt a lot drier, although it was definitely straighter after the cold smoothing.

Cold smoothing is a technique that uses no heat in the actual chemical process, and unlike Japanese straightening, it does not leave the hair completely poker straight, and allows the client to still do curly and wavy hairstyles, just with less frizz. I have to say, I did notice less frizz, but I still felt as though cold smoothing pulled some of the shine out of my hair.

If cold smoothing left the shine in and the healthy feeling, I'd say it's a great process, however, I was left a little "cold" feeling on this one, if I may use such a bad pun! It's less expensive as well, but only by about $200 usually. It is also less time consuming at the salon, so those are definitely two plusses to this option.

Now, onto the final straightening technique that I've had personal experience with. It's home straightening. I went to a local beauty supply store to try my hand at my own straightening to save a little money and to experiment and see what kind of results I could get. I would not recommend this method to anyone unless they get a superior home system and know what they are doing.

Furthermore, I don't think there are any home straightening kits out there that do an exceptional job. If there are, I don't know about them and would certainly like to, but my experience is a mediocre outcome and a messy, smelly application that seems to suck the shine and health right out of your hair.

The results with these home hair straightening kits also are not long lasting, and they tend to be more damaging than nurturing and moisturizing in most cases. There may be a time when they come out with a better option, but for right now, I'd say avoid them if you can and instead opt for a professional treatment.

Hairstyles and Hair Ideas For Clubbing

Outrageous skin baring outfits aren't the only way to get noticed during a night on the town, whether you're at Pure in Las Vegas or at the club down the street. If you want to break out of your boring hair rut and make an entrance worthy of an A-list celeb, there are dozens of ways to do it. Experiment with a dark Goth image, a wispy, playful emo cut, or create your own clubbing do. Here's a rundown of some of the wildest styles on the big city club scene.

PUNK

Your imagination is the limit with punk hair. Worn with spikes, wild colors and Mohawks for that outrageous night out, the key lies in the cut, not the color. Usually short and spiky, punk cuts can also feature hair cut long on one side and short on the other or one side of the head shaved clean. The Mohawk and all its variations, including liberty spikes and the fanned hawk, in which the strip in the middle of the head resembles a fan, remains a favorite of adventurous teens and twenty-somethings.

To add a crazy tint to your punk style, try brush-on colors with products like Streekers. Apply colors with a wand to the strands you want, then remove them when you shampoo. This is a great way to get multicolored braids or sections of hair without time-consuming or sloppy dyes or sprays.

RETRO GLAMOUR

Short Hair

Think about all those bright wild fashions in the "Austin Powers�" movies-with hairstyles to match. The short geometric hairstyles made famous by models like Twiggy and seen on hundreds of dancers in TV shows, these simple, angular cuts are geared to bone-straight hair. Revisit them for clubbing by putting a modern twist on them, ala the Posh Spice bob.

Long hair� works well on teens and twenty-somethings. Usually worn straight, you may add wave with curlers or a curling iron depending on the length.

Bouffants and Beehives

A 1950s or 1960s theme night at a club brings in all kinds of retro hairdos, including the bouffant and the beehive. Of course, the Amy Winehouse version is in vogue now, but the troubled songstress wasn't the first to perfect the look.

Leather jacketed rocker gals championed the look in the 50s and First Lady Jackie Kennedy brought the bouffant look into the mainstream in the early 1960s. Achieve the beehive look by using a combination of different size rollers and sectioning the hair from front to back. The large curls required huge hair rollers secured with bobby pins. Clairol hot rollers or the drugstore bought soft rollers (yes, they still make 'em). The Amy Winehouse bouffant is simpler. Just section the hair and clip on a hairpiece to the crown of the head.

GOTH (The Goth� look)

Hair color really makes a difference with Goth hair. This genre, characterized by deep black and burnished red colors, lends itself to longer hair, intricate braiding and the occasional choppy or spiky style.

If you're going out to a Goth or 'industrial music'� club, you'll need a hairstyle that complements the PVC, leather or vinyl favored by patrons of such clubs, and longer hair just looks better with most of those outfits. Try browsing Goth music or fashion sites to get ideas for potentials hairstyles. If you don't have time to braid your own hair, try Sally Beauty Supply or other stores for clip-ons.

Don't wash your hair everyday if you want to maintain vivid punk or Goth colored hair. If you dye your hair extreme 'Goth'� black, it's hard to go back. It's best to visit a professional colorist to prevent damage if you want to return to your original color. The same goes for hair colored with henna. If you change your mind a lot or are a hairstyle chameleon stick with icy blondes or spray/paint on colors. You can accessorize Goth hair with everything from spider web� clips to skull and skeleton bows.

EMO/SHORT

Don't mistake the punk cuts mentioned above for 'emo.'� Emo hair is much shorter and less dependent on color and accessories than Goth hair. Short and choppy works best. Show your ears with the pixie cut, which looks even better with crazy colors. Girls' emo hair tends to be really short and messy, either directly from the cut or from scrunching it up yourself after the fact. Try a pixie cut that exposes the ears, preferably with bangs. Add streaks. At any given club or emo concert, you'll find girls (and some guys) with dark brown or black hair with white streaks or tips.


Kareena Kapoor

Kareena Kapoor
Kareena Kapoor
Kareena Kapoor
Kareena Kapoor
Kareena Kapoor

Kareena Kapoor (aka Bebo) is an Indian Bollywood film actress who made her Hindi film debut in 2000 with movie Refugee alongside Abhishek Bachchan, which earned her the Filmfare Best Female Debut Award. She is sister of actress Karisma Kapoor.

Currently she is filming for Main Aurr Mrs Khanna.

Check out more information and pictures of Kareena in our previous posts here.


Bill Kaulitz long hairstyle for men

Cool Bill Kaulitz
Bill Kaulitz long hairstyle
Bill Kaulitz layered black and white hair style would fit right in on the same stage.
Bill Kaulitz
Bill Kaulitz
Bill Kaulitz cool hairstyle
Bill Kaulitz
mens long hairstyle

Ashton Kutcher Short Celebrity Hairstyles New

Ashton Kutcher is 6' 3'' in height, and his date of birth is February 7, 1978. If you want to look like Ashton Kutcher then take a printout of his picture and take to your salon or hairstylist. Some more information are given below. Ashton really knows how to work his hair.

Ashton Kutcher Hairstyle Picture
Ashton Kutcher Hairstyle

Ashton Kutcher Hairstyle
Celebrity hairstyle Ashton Kutcher
Ashton Kutcher Hairstyle
Celebrity hairstyle Ashton Kutcher
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Celebrity hairstyle Ashton Kutcher